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Pack a thermos and head to the beach

Wednesday 19 April 2017

You can take part in protecting Eurobodalla’s spectacular coastline by doing a quick clean-up when enjoying local beaches and rivers.

Government agencies, community organisations and individuals are working hard look to after the local environment, and Council’s environmental education officer Bernadette Davis said residents and visitors could pitch in by picking up marine debris and logging what they find online.

“Picking up marine debris doesn’t have to be a drag. Next time you head off to your local beach or river, make the most of where you are,” she said.

“Take an old-fashioned picnic like your Nanna used to make before we started our obsession with single use plastics like cutlery, straws and coffee cups. Dust off the thermos and pack some sandwiches before you head to the beach. Just add the clean up as part of your day.”

An important part of the task is logging what you find with the Tangaroa Blue Foundation. Data sheets are available at www.tangaroablue.org/resources/data-sheet.html

“By recording the marine debris all levels of government can see what we are picking up and where it originated from,” Ms Davis said.

“This allows governments and organisations to tackle the waste and litter problem at the source.”

Ms Davis said the most effective way to reduce the harmful effects of marine debris was to prevent it from entering the marine environment in the first place.

“Litter on the street or roadsides will find its way into the rivers and ocean where it can damage marine life and sea birds,” she said.

“We live and play in an area that other Australians and internationals dream about.

“By picking up litter and marine debris you’ll be helping to protect this rolling blue green coastline for generations to come.”

The Eurobodalla Marine Debris Working Group explores ways to address marine debris, especially plastic items that threaten our local marine environment. It includes divers, fishers, surfers, school groups, conservation groups and scientists from Eurobodalla and the ACT.