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Landcare

Working together for a sustainable environment

Landcare is a unique Australian partnership between the community, government and business, working together to manage, protect and repair our environment.

More than 5,500 volunteer community Landcare groups around Australia are tackling land degradation and other important environmental issues. This means anything from poor water quality, salinity and erosion, loss of biodiversity, poor soil health, impacts from climate change, impacts from invasive species, coastal degradation, marine debris issues, and a loss of Australian wildlife.

Eurobodalla Landcare is a network of 24 active Landcare groups within Eurobodalla Shire, consisting of approximately 300 volunteers involved in a variety of activities from South Durras to Tilba.

These activities include:

  • weed control
  • protecting waterways
  • fencing
  • erosion control
  • planting native vegetation
  • feral animal control
  • rubbish collection
  • encouraging mammal conservation through the use of nesting boxes, and
  • protecting local native birds by eliminating Indian Mynas.

Through Landcare, our community learns about natural resources while getting involved in a wide range of activities including on-ground works, research, monitoring, planning, education, and community awareness.

Eurobodalla Landcare groups develop and implement local solutions to local problems.

Making a difference

Eurobodalla Landcare is making a difference to our local environment. The South Durras Landcare group was recognised for its valuable contribution at the NSW Coastal Management Awards in 2018.

The group won the community involvement award for its continued contribution to the environment and exceptional service to the local community over the past three decades.

The group was heavily involved in the reshaping and revegetation of the dunes in the late '80s and early '90s under the dune reclamation scheme. With nearly 4km of coastline to protect, this was no mean feat.

They continue to protect this same coastline decades later through continued invasive species control (both weeds and feral animals), protection of native fauna and flora, access consolidation, erosion control, fencing, revegetation, litter collection, training and community education.

The group also helped to build and maintain well-utilised infrastructure such as the South Durras whale watching platform, Cookies Beach viewing platform, Durras Headland recreational fishing access stairway and viewing platform, and the South Durras shared walkway and footpath - all of which contribute to the public amenity, tourist attraction and environmental protection of this beautiful area.

Get involved now

Volunteering for Landcare has many benefits - it's easy, fun and a great way to give back to your community, while shaping the future direction of the environment in which we live.

Other benefits of joining a Landcare group include:

  • Repair and protect the land for future generations.Landcare group volunteering
  • Become more centered and grounded.
  • Get active!
  • You can make a difference.
  • Learn about your local birds, plants and wildlife.
  • It's fun and rewarding.
  • Time to appreciate nature.
  • Discover local, natural, hidden gems in your own backyard.
  • Entertain the kids and teach them the wonders of nature.
  • Learn about the cultural significance of plants and animals.
  • Positively affects mental health.
  • Connect with new friends.
  • Get to know your neighbours.

Volunteers undertake training to improve their skills in a range of natural resource management practices, and are also active in promotion and education events with the wider community.

Find a volunteer group near you

If you're interested in becoming a volunteer, you can search for your nearest Landcare group below:

More information

We can help you

If you would like to get involved, or find out more information about Eurobodalla Landcare groups, contact Eurobodalla's Local Landcare Coordinator, Emma Patyus, on: